Talk
October 23, 2021

Cultures in Conversation

Never Be Lost: Learn to Read the Stars

October 23, 2021 | Off-Site

The cultural imagination of the celestial and how important systems of knowledge have been passed down through literature, memory, and oral narratives, continuing to hold meaning as we imagine space futures.

Starts 5:00 PM

Ends 6:00 PM

Venue Off-Site

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Co-curated by Australian Pavilion

This programme considers the cultural imagination of the celestial and how important systems of knowledge have been passed down through literature, memory, and oral narratives, continuing to hold meaning as we imagine space futures.

The Kamal is a simple celestial instrument, just a board and knotted string, that was used by Arab navigators from the 9th century. Sailors also used poetry as a mnemonic to record and pass on directions in the easily memorised ruttier form. In Australia and New Zealand, mapping of the sky remains alive through a new generation of astronomers. Bridging these systems of knowledge through literature and memory, we consider how the cultural imagination of the celestial have been constructed and understood, continuing to hold meaning as we imagine space futures

Participants: Nujoom Alghanem, Duane Hamacher, Mashhoor Ahmad Al Wardat, Rangi Mātāmua

Location: Australian Pavilion, Mobility District, Expo 2020

Co-curated by Australian Pavilion

In Associated with UAE Space Agency

Programme:
- Opening remarks by Kevin Jones (Strategy Consultant, Alserkal)
- Video by Professor Dr. Rangi Matamua (Tūhoe) (Professor at the University of Waikato)
- Presentation by Dr. Mashhoor Ahmad Al Wardat (Professor of Astrophysics)
- Video by Dr. Duane Hamacher (Associate Professor of Cultural Astronomy)
- Artist intervention by Nujoom Alghanem (Poet, Artist and Film Director)


So, what is Cultures in Conversation?

Commissioned from Alserkal by Expo2020, Cultures in Conversation consists of ten theme weeks of events and interventions that challenge the typical ‘talks’ format. Multi-disciplinary and cross-cultural, the programme unites people who are normally unlikely to even be in the same room—poets, diplomats, theorists, artists, environmental agents of change, academics. Part of Expo’s wider series entitled Programme for People and Planet (PPP),Cultures in Conversation is less about global leaders owning top-down conversation, and more an opportunity for diverse people from around the world to unite, take ownership of a programme, and re-think global issues that have become excruciatingly urgent.